Puzzle Place

Equivalent Problems - Grade 1 (04/15/2020)


Use the numbers 1-9 to make this equation true:  ____ + ____ = ____ + ____

(You may only use the digits once)


  • Then, explain your thinking.  
  • How many different ways can you solve it?

(Problem adapted from Open Middle)  

Equivalent Problems - Grades 2-6 (04/15/2020)


Use the numbers 1-9 to make this equation true:   ____ = ____ + ____ = ____ + ____ + ____

(You may only use the digits once)


  • Then, explain your thinking.  
  • How many solutions did you find?  

(Problem from Open Middle)

The Fold-and-Cut Challenge - Grades K-6 (04/14/2020)


Materials Needed:  Paper and scissors (pencil is optional)


Grades K-3

Directions:  

  • Take a piece of paper and fold it in half.
  • Draw a curvy line on the folded edge of the paper and cut it out.  Open it and show the figure to your child.
  • Give your child these series of challenges:  “Can you fold a piece of paper in half and cut out the following shapes?”
    • Rectangle
    • Square
    • Circle
    • Heart
    • Triangle
    • Star
    • Plus sign
    • The letter H
    • The letter X
    • The letter M
    • A person

Grades 4-6

Directions:  

  • Ask your child, “Can you take a piece of paper and fold it so that with a single, straight cut you can cut a square out from the middle of this paper?”
  • Look at the Grades 4-6 handout with increasingly difficult shapes to fold and cut.
  • Remind your child that these shapes should be cut out from the paper with just ONE straight cut.

Block It - Grades K-6 (04/09/2020)

Materials: 

  • Pattern Blocks (or use Pattern Shapes app. You can click here.)
  • Paper
  • Pen or pencil

Objective:  To use all of your pattern blocks to earn the highest score.

Directions:

  1. Two players are needed to play.
  2. Each person receives three of each pattern block:
  • Green Triangle
  • Blue Rhombus
  • Red Trapezoid
  • Yellow Hexagon
  1. Each color block is assigned a point:
  • Green Triangle – 1 point
  • Blue Rhombus – 2 points
  • Red Trapezoid – 3 points
  • Yellow Hexagon – 6 points
  1. Game begins with one yellow hexagon placed on the playing surface, this piece does not belong to any player. 
  2. Player 1, must place his/her block such that one side of the block is completely touching one side of the yellow hexagon. 
  3. Each player will take a turn to add a block, until BOTH players use all of their blocks.

Scoring Sample:

  1. Player 1 plays a green triangle (1 point).  The green triangle (1 point) touches one full side of the yellow hexagon (6 points).   Player 1 scores a total of 7 points (1 + 6).
  2. Player 2 plays a red trapezoid (3 points).  The red trapezoid touches one full side of the green triangle (1 point) and one full side of the yellow hexagon (6 points).  Player 2 scores a total of 10 points (3 + 1 + 6).
  3. Continue to play and add scores until BOTH players use all of their blocks. 

Questions to promote problem solving skills and thinking:

  1. Students share their final scores. 
  2. How did you determine where to place your blocks?
  3. If you could play again, what might you do differently?
  4. Would you recommend using blocks with higher point values first or last?  Explain your thinking. 
  5. What was the most points a player scored in one turn?
  6. What might be the most points a player could score in one turn?
  7. Is there an advantage by going first?  Explain your thinking. 
  8. Is there a maximum score a player can earn?
  9. If pattern blocks were assigned a different point value, how would it affect your game play?  

 

(Adapted from game created by:  Fay Zenigami)

Penny, Nickel, Dime - Grades 2-6 (04/08/2020)

Materials Needed:  

  • Pennies
  • Nickels
  • Dimes
  •  One 6-sided die (if you don’t have one, use the virtual dice or see examples in Coach’s Corner)

How to Win:  Come as close as possible to getting $1 without going over.


How to Play:

  • Roll the die.
  • Whatever number it lands on, you may take that many pennies, nickels, or that many dimes.
  • Repeat for six times total (you will roll a total of 6 times)

(From mathforlove.com)

Close Call - Grade 1-6 (04/03/2020)

Objective:  Add up close to 100 without going over.


Materials needed:

A deck of cards

Paper & pencil


How to Play:

  • Deal each player 4 cards from the deck.
  • Arrange the cards so you make two two-digit numbers that add up close to 100 without going over.
  • The player who is closest to 100 without going over gets a point.
  • Use the paper pencil to keep score.
  • The first player to 10 points wins the game.

Salute Addition - Grades K-2 (04/02/2020)

This game is to reinforce the quick recall of basic addition facts.


You need:  

  • Deck of cards (the Aces act as 1)
    • For Grade K, only play with cards from 1-5
    • For Grades 1 & 2,  remove all picture cards from the deck
  • Three players

How to Play:

  • Place the cards in a pile, face down.  
  • Two players pick up a card.
  • Players do not look at their card but hold the card, facing out, on their foreheads in a “salute.”
  • Player 3 adds the numbers on the two cards they can see and calls out the answer.
  • Player 1 and player 2 have to work out from the answer the value of the card on their forehead.
  • The game is repeated with the players swapping their roles.

Salute Multiplication - Grades 3-6 (04/02/2020)

This game is to reinforce the quick recall of basic multiplication facts.


You need:  

  • Deck of cards, with the picture cards removed (the Aces at as 1)  
  • Three players

How to Play:

  • Place the cards in a pile, face down.  
  • Two players pick up a card.
  • Players do not look at their card but hold the card, facing out, on their foreheads in a “salute.”
  • Player three multiplies the numbers on the two cards they can see and calls out the answer.
  • Player one and player two have to work out from the answer the value of the card on their forehead.
  • The game is repeated with the players swapping their roles.

Change for the Better* - Grades 2-6 (04/01/2020)

Materials: Each player needs 1 quarter, 2 dimes, 3 nickels, and 4 pennies.


How to Play: 

  • Play in groups of 2 to 6. 
  • Each player takes a turn. 
  • On their turn they put in one coin in the middle of the table. 
  • They can take out a combination of coins that is less than the value of what they put in. (For example, if you put in a dime (10¢) you can take back up to 9¢ – if it is there. If you put in a penny, you can’t get any money back because there is nothing less than 1¢.)
  • Play continues until only one person has money left.

Instruction: Beginning players should just concentrate on the moves of the game. After students have gained some experience with the game, they can try recording their games to translate to symbolic representation. The data collected can then be examined for patterns.


*Parents:  Not recommended for Grades K & 1 students because they don’t cover money in their standards.  However, if you are willing to work with your child to learn it, they can play this game too.  


(This game is based off of a James Ernest design.)


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ELA Connection

Think about --- What is happening in the poem?  Why is this poem funny?  


Smart

by Shel Silverstein


My dad gave me one dollar bill

'Cause I'm his smartest son,

And I swapped it for two shiny quarters

'Cause two is more than one!


And then I took the quarters

And traded them to Lou

For three dimes -- I guess he don't know

That three is more than two!


Just then, along came old blind Bates

And just 'cause he can't see

He gave me four nickels for my three dimes,

And four is more than three!


And I took the nickels to Hiram Coombs

Down at the seed-feed store,

And the fool gave me five pennies for them,

And five is more than four!


And then I went and showed my dad,

And he got red in the cheeks

And closed his eyes and shook his head--

Too proud of me to speak!

Total 15 - Grades K-6 (03/31/2020)

This game helps students practice their flexibility and fluency with numbers.


How to win:  Get three cards that total 15.


Materials:  A deck of cards (1-9 only) or make number cards with numerals 1-9 on them


How to play:  

  • Take out one suit of cards with numbers (1-9).  The suit you choose doesn’t matter.
  • Place the nine cards on a table in order from 1 through 9.
  • Take turns choosing one card.  
  • The first player who gets three cards that total 15 wins.

Things to think about after you play the game:

  • Which strategy was more successful for you?  Trying to make three cards that make 15 or trying to block your opponent from making 15?  
  • Are there some cards that are better to have than others?
  • If you play this game again, how would you play differently?
  • How many different ways can you make 15 with three cards?

Kindergarten students:

Play this game with only cards from 1-5.

  • Option 1:  Just flip two cards from the pile and add the numbers together.  
  • Option 2:  Use two dice instead.  Roll the dice. Add the numbers together.

Race to 20 - Grades K-6 (03/30/2020)


Here is a counting game to try with a partner.

  • The object of the game is to NOT be the first one to say “20”.
  • When it’s your turn, count 1 or 2 numbers.  (The first player says, “1” or “1, 2.” The second player continues the count with the next 1 or 2 numbers.)
  • Whoever says “20” loses the game.
  • Play this game many times to try and discover a winning strategy.

For Kindergarten students make it a Race to 10:

  • For younger students, put out 10 pennies (or similar objects like water bottle caps) to take away one or two at a time to make it more visual and tangible for students. 
  • Play the game the same way as Race to 20 (except only go to 10).

Things to think about and challenge questions:

  • Does going first always guarantee a win?  Or is going second more ideal?
  • Are there certain numbers that come up before 20 that guarantee a win?  What are they?
  • How soon can you guarantee a win?
  • If we changed the losing number to 21, how would the game change?
  • If you changed the game and said that the winner would be the person who says the number “20”, how would your strategy to win change?
  • What if you changed the rules a little and said that you can count either 1, 2 or 3 numbers at a time?  How would your strategy to win change? 

Different versions of the game:

  • Change the losing number to “21” (or any number of your choice).
  • Make the person who says the number “20” the winner instead of the loser.
  • Change the numbers that you can count from to be “1”, “1, 2”, or “1, 2, 3.”

Pig - Grade K (03/27/2020)

This is a quick game that can be played to practice addition.  It provides fun by tempting a player with making that next roll to get a higher score.  Dice or an app to simulate a dice roll can make this activity fun to practice. I adapted this lesson specifically for kindergarten students.  

Task Instructions:

  • The goal is to be the first player to reach 20 (you can go up to 50 if you want but in kindergarten we try to keep it within 20).
  • On your turn, roll the die and determine the sum.  You can either stop and record that number or continue rolling and add the numbers together.
  • Roll the die as many times as you choose.  Again, when you decide to stop, record the current total for your score (and add it to your previous score).

But be careful!  If you roll a 5 on the die, your turn ends and 0 is your recorded score for that turn.  And, if you roll a 6, your turn ends and your ENTIRE score is set back to 0.  

Materials

One die (dice)

Paper & pencil (to keep track of score)


(Adapted from Helping with Math at Home:  More Ideas for Parents. 2006. Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.)

Pig - Grades 1-6 (03/27/2020)

This is a quick game that can be played to practice addition.  It provides fun by tempting a player with making that next roll to get a higher score.  Dice or an app to simulate a dice roll can make this activity fun to practice.

Task Instructions:

  • The goal is to be the first player to reach 100.
  • On your turn, roll the dice and determine the sum.  You can either stop and record that sum or continue rolling and add the new sums together.
  • Roll the pair of dice as many times as you choose.  Again, when you decide to stop, record the current total for your score (and add it to your previous score).

But beware!  If you roll a 1 exactly on one die, your turn ends and 0 is your recorded score for that turn.  And, if you roll double 1’s, your turn ends and your ENTIRE score is set back to 0.

Materials

Two dice

Paper & pencil (to keep track of total score)


(From Helping with Math at Home:  More Ideas for Parents. 2006. Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann.)

  1. Click on the Pattern Shapes link.
  2. Under the shape pictures on the left hand side, click on the shadowed shape of a person in a boat.
  3. Select one of the outlined pictures.
  4. Using the shapes on the left, fill in the outlined picture.
  5. (optional) Take a photo your completed picture and email to stacie.kaichi@k12.hi.us
  6. Clear the shapes and fill in the outlined picture again in a different way.
  7. (Optional) Take a photo of your completed picture and email to stacie.kaichi@k12.hi.us